Publications

CSU Extension: Agriculture

CSU Extension has many publications to help the small acreage owner, urban agriculture, producer and others interested in Agriculture in Colorado. Topics include crops, farm management, and livestock.

CSU Wheat Breeding and Genetics

The CSU Wheat Breeding and Genetics program has multiple publications and links to various websites. There is a lot of useful resources to benefit wheat producers in Colorado and surrounding states.

Insect Pest Management

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

These publications were prepared to help producers manage insect populations with the best available methods proven practical under Kansas conditions. They are revised annually and intended for use during the current calendar year. The user should know that pesticide label directions and restrictions are subject to change, and some may have changed since the date of publication.

University Research 

Sulfur deficiency in wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

December 9, 2021

In recent years, sulfur (S) deficiency in wheat has become more common in many areas of Kansas, particularly in no-till wheat. The likely reasons for this are a reduction in sulfur additions to the crop from atmospheric deposition (there is less S in the air now) and cooler soil temperatures as a result of no-till which slows S mineralization in the soil...

Crop residues: Nutritive value and options for grazing

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

November 18, 2021

The five-year average of corn acres harvested reported by NASS leads to an estimate of approximately 5.5 million acres of corn and 200,000 tons of residue produced annually in Kansas. In addition, 2.8 million acres of grain sorghum and 70,000 tons of residue were produced. While not all acres are suitable for grazing, this represents a tremendous resource for the state...

Replanting decisions for winter wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

October 21, 2021

As wheat growers evaluate their wheat stand, some may be considering replanting fields yet this fall. The potential causes of poor or uneven emergence or stand establishment are many and may differ from field to field...

Management adjustments when sowing wheat late

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

October 21, 2021

According to the most recent USDA report released on October 18, about 75% of Kansas wheat has been planted this fall, which is above the 5-yr average of 68%. However, some producers may have delayed planting for different reasons, including harvesting a summer crop during late October or, especially during this growing season, dry soils and waiting for significant precipitation to occur...

In-furrow fertilizers for wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

September 16, 2021

Wheat is considered a highly responsive crop to band-applied fertilizers, particularly phosphorus (P). Application of P as starter fertilizer can be an effective method for part or all the P needs. Wheat plants typically show a significant increase in fall tillers (Figure 1) and better root development with the use of starter fertilizer (P and N)...

Common causes of late-season stalk lodging in corn

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

September 9, 2021

Stalk lodging in corn occurs when the stalk weakens and breaks at some point below the ear (Figure 1). When this occurs, it results in harvest losses and slows down harvesting considerably. Grain moisture levels may also be unacceptably high in lodged corn...

New research examines tillering impacts on corn yields

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

September 2, 2021

Precipitation is a key limiting factor for corn production, particularly in western Kansas. Management strategies, such as reduced plant populations, are commonly used to match crop demands with environmental resource supply...

Management options for stressed corn

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

August 26, 2021

Where dryland corn has been under severe drought and/or heat stress, producers have to decide whether to let it go and hope for some kind of grain yield, salvage the crop for silage or hay, or leave the crop in the field for its residue value...

Planning your wheat fertility program: Start now by soil testing

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

August 26, 2021

Wheat planting is just a month or so away in parts of Kansas, so now is the time to get your soil sampling done to have good information on which to base your fertilizer inputs. This is particularly important with the higher fertilizer price this year contributing to very tight margins for wheat...

Final irrigation of the growing season - Timing is everything

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

August 20, 2021

As the growing season wraps up, producers have an opportunity to improve their water productivity by properly timing their final irrigation application. This is an important decision as an early termination of irrigation can result in reductions in grain yield, primarily through reductions in the kernel weight yield component...

Corn production issues - Droopy ears

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

August 20, 2021

Corn farmers are reporting concerns as the crop is approaching maturity. One of the main issues is about the premature ear droop observed in several fields across the state. Corn plants typically maintain the ears in the upright position until after the crop has reached full maturity (black layer - around 35% grain moisture in the kernels)...

Pre-emergence herbicides for wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

August 12, 2021

Pre-emergence herbicides with residual activity are an important component of high-yielding cropping systems. They are used less frequently in wheat production compared to other cropping systems in Kansas, but residual herbicides applied prior to wheat emergence can be part of a good weed management system in wheat production...

Estimating corn yield potential

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

July 29, 2021

Once pollination is near completion or fully complete, producers can begin to estimate corn yield potential. To get a reasonable yield estimate, corn should be (at least) in the milk stage. Before the milk stage, it is difficult to tell which kernels will develop and which ones will abort...

Considerations for weed control following wheat harvest

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

June 24, 2021

Post-harvest weed control in wheat stubble is very important to conserve soil moisture and prevent weeds from going to seed and adding to the weed seedbank that must be managed in future years. Weeds can grow quickly once the wheat canopy is removed and can easily become difficult to manage, especially in the hot, dry conditions of summer...

Herbicide carryover considerations when planting after wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

June 17, 2021

Growers considering re-cropping wheat fields need to consider the herbicide program that was used in the wheat crop. Many wheat herbicides have fairly long crop rotation restrictions. Selected herbicides and rotation intervals to certain crops are listed in Table 1...

Herbicide applications and high temperatures

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

June 17, 2021

Summer temperatures have arrived, with high temperatures over 100°F in parts of Kansas. If you are planning herbicide applications, here are some things to consider when applying herbicides during hot weather...

Wheat harvest: Identifying disease problems and setting harvest priorities

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

June 10, 2021

As we look toward harvest in parts of the state, we wanted to provide some reminders about diseases that may affect either grain quality or the viability of grain that is destined to be saved for seed. At this point in the season most disease management decisions have been made, but there are some strategies for mitigating losses on heavily infected fields...

Pre-harvest weed control in wheat

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

June 3, 2021

Making a herbicide application that will not directly influence crop yield is a difficult decision to make. However, pre-harvest applications may be beneficial, especially in wheat fields that were not treated earlier in the season...

Estimating western corn rootworm egg hatch and adult emergence

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

May 27, 2021

Degree-day models are useful tools for estimating the development of many different insects, allowing us to predict when potential pests might begin to impact a crop.  In the case of the Western Corn Rootworm (WCR), degree-day calculations can be used to determine the onset of egg hatch in an area, peak egg hatch and the timing of adult emergence...

Effect of standing water and saturated soils on corn growth

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

May 27, 2021

If corn has been planted, standing water or saturated soil conditions in areas of a field can produce impacts now or later for corn. Periods of early-season water saturation can cause immediate problems for small corn plants, and can have season-long implications as well...

University of Minnesota researchers develop 99.9% accurate genetic test for early detection of Palmer Amaranth

Source: AgroNews

April 6, 2021

Palmer Amaranth is a high-impact agronomic weed species that has cost the United States agriculture industry billions of dollars since its discovery outside of its native range in the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. Over the last 20 years, it has moved further north, and now poses a major threat to corn, soybean, and cotton growers across the south and Midwest regions of the United States...

What are the causes of yellow wheat?

Source: K-State Agronomy eUpdate

April 1, 2021

During this time of the year, it is normal to start seeing some wheat fields turn yellow. The pattern may vary from field to field, sometimes as large areas, small patches, or streaks of yellowish wheat in some fields this spring. What are some of the main causes of yellow wheat in the spring?...